Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 104 Reg MurphyReflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 104 Reg Murphy

Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 104 Reg Murphy

Descriptive Summary

Title: Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 104 Reg Murphy
Creator Murphy, John Reginald, 1934-
Dates 2010 February 9
Extent 1.0 interview
Repository Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies
AbstractJohn Reginald "Reg" Murphy attended Mercer University in Macon, and worked for the Macon Telegraph. In 1955 he opened the Atlanta bureau of the Macon Telegraph. He was chosen to be a Neiman Fellow at Harvard in 1959, and in 1961 went to work for the Atlanta Constitution as political editor. He became managing editor of Atlanta magazine in 1965, and returned to the Constitution in 1968, succeeding Ralph McGill as editor. In 1975 Murphy left Georgia for the San Francisco Examiner, and in 1981 went to the Baltimore Sun. In 1996 he joined the National Geographic Society as president and chief executive. In 1999 his biography of Griffin Bell, Uncommon Sense: The Achievement of Griffin Bell was published. Murphy discusses his kidnapping, his time working as a journalist in Atlanta, and Atlanta's development into the cultural hub of the South.

Administrative Information

Custodial History note

Reflections on Georgia Politics began in the fall of 2006 at Young Harris College, as a lecture and discussion program hosted by Georgia political veteran Bob Short. In late 2007, the Richard B. Russell Library began producing the program as an oral history video series to further illuminate and personalize the tectonic shifts that occurred in Georgia politics in the late twentieth century.

Preferred citation

Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 104, Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Georgia, 30602-1641.


Restrictions

Copyright Information

Resources may be used under the guidelines described by the U.S. Copyright Office in Section 107, Title 17, United States Code (Fair use). Parties interested in production or commercial use of the resources should contact the Russell Library for a fee schedule.


Biographical Note

John Reginald "Reg" Murphy was born in 1934 in Gainesville, Georgia. He attended Mercer University in Macon, and worked for the Macon Telegraph. In 1955 he opened the Atlanta bureau of the Macon Telegraph. He was chosen to be a Neiman Fellow at Harvard in 1959, and in 1961 went to work for the Atlanta Constitution as political editor. He became managing editor of Atlanta magazine in 1965, and returned to the Constitution in 1968, succeeding Ralph McGill as editor. In 1975 Murphy left Georgia for the San Francisco Examiner, and in 1981 went to the Baltimore Sun. In 1996 he joined the National Geographic Society as president and chief executive. In 1999 his biography of Griffin Bell, Uncommon Sense: The Achievement of Griffin Bell was published.


Scope and Content

Reg Murphy recalls growing up in Gainesville, Georgia, and attending Mercer University. He discusses working for the Macon Telegraph and covering the integration of the University of Georgia. Murphy recalls receiving a Neiman Fellowship at Harvard University for a year.

Murphy recalls covering the state capitol for first the Macon Telegraph and then the Atlanta Constitution. He recalls uncovering corruption in the Griffin Administration. Murphy recalls covering events during Governor Vandiver's administration including the demise of the unit system and the Baker v. Carr reapportionment case. He recalls working with Ralph McGill and explains how he was offered the role of editor of the Atlanta Constitution.

Murphy discusses Bill Hartsfield's and Ivan Allen's roles in advancing the national reputation of Atlanta and Georgia overall. He recalls the development of Georgia Tech and the University of Georgia and Dr. Martin Luther King's influence on African American political activity in Atlanta. Murphy weighs in on the Three Governors Controversy in 1944 and the tumultuous 1966 gubernatorial election that involved the United States Supreme Court.

Murphy comments on the "one man, one vote" decision and explains its significance in Georgia history. He also discusses the importance of Atlanta as a hub for the Civil Rights Movement, recalling the actions of Ralph David Abernathy and Vernon Jordon. Murphy reflects on Jimmy Carter's campaign for governor and subsequently President.

Murphy recalls being kidnapped by extremists, discusses the kidnapping of Patty Hearst, and comments on the state of print journalism in America.


Related Collections in this Repository

Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection


Access Points

Abernathy, Ralph, 1926-1990
Allen, Ivan, 1877-1968
Atlanta journal-constitution.
Civil rights movements--Georgia.
College integration--Georgia--Athens--History.
Georgia. Governor (1971-1975 : Carter)
Hartsfield, William Berry.
Journalism--United States--Georgia.
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968.
McGill, Ralph, 1898-1969.
Newspapers
Oral histories.
Political campaigns--United States--Georgia.
Political corruption--United States.
Vandiver, S. Ernest (Samuel Ernest), 1918-2005.

Series Descriptions and Folder Listing

 
ROGP 104 Reg Murphy video ( 96.0 minutes ) VIEW ONLINE
 
ROGP 104 Reg Murphy transcript VIEW ONLINE