Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 133 Julian BondReflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 133 Julian Bond

Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 133 Julian Bond

Descriptive Summary

Title: Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 133 Julian Bond
Creator: Bond, Julian, 1940-
Dates: 27 February 2012
Extent: 1.0 interview
Collection Number: RBRL/220/ROGP
Repository: Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies
Abstract: Julian Bond was a civil rights activist who held leadership roles in several organizations, including the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the Southern Poverty Law Center, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He helped organize civil rights activities such as sit-ins, protests, and voter registration drives across Georgia. He also held public office as a member of the Georgia House, and, later, senate. In this interview, Bond discusses his early years, his education at Morehouse College, and his involvement in the civil rights movement, including his activities with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). He talks about the racial and political climate in Atlanta in the 1960s. Bond also describes his experience in the political arena as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives and, later, the Georgia senate.

Collection Description

Biographical note

Horace Julian Bond was born on January 14, 1940, in Nashville, Tennessee. As a student of all-black Morehouse College in Atlanta, Bond began his commitment to the civil rights movement when he helped to organize the Committee on the Appeal for Human Rights. In 1960 Bond helped to form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), a student organization that provided grassroots support for civil rights in local communities. Bond served as communications director of SNCC, editing its protest magazine The Atlanta Inquirer. In 1965 he won a seat to the Georgia legislature, but was denied his seat because of his outspoken opposition to the Vietnam War. Bond would be elected by his district and denied a seat a total of three times before the U.S. Supreme Court declared the actions of the Georgia House unconstitutional. Bond took his seat in the House in 1967 and served there until 1974, when he was elected to the Georgia senate. Around this time, Bond served as president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights law firm. As senator, Bond became the first African-American chair of the Fulton County delegation and chaired the Committee on Consumer Affairs. In 1971 he led a voter registration drives in the predominately black communities of Georgia. Bond retired from the senate in 1986 to run for the U.S. Congress, but lost to longtime friend and fellow civil rights activist John Lewis. He became a history professor at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville and a chair to the board of directors of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Scope and Content

Bond discusses his early years, his education at Morehouse College, and his involvement in the civil rights movement, including his activities with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). He talks about the racial and political climate in Atlanta in the 1960s, at a time when he was organizing sit-ins, protests, and voter registration drives. He also details his experience in the political arena as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives and, later, the Georgia senate.


Administrative Information and Restrictions

Custodial History note

Reflections on Georgia Politics began in the fall of 2006 at Young Harris College, as a lecture and discussion program hosted by Georgia political veteran Bob Short. In late 2007, the Richard B. Russell Library began producing the program as an oral history video series to further illuminate and personalize the tectonic shifts that occurred in Georgia politics in the late twentieth century.

Preferred citation

Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 133, Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Georgia, 30602-1641.

Copyright Information

Before material from collections at the Richard B. Russell Library may be quoted in print, or otherwise reproduced, Resources may be used under the guidelines described by the U.S. Copyright Office in Section 107, Title 17, United States Code (Fair use). Parties interested in production or commercial use of the resources should contact the Russell Library for a fee schedule.

Finding Aid Publication

Finding aid prepared by Russell staff, 2013.


Related Materials

Access Points

Civil rights movements--Georgia.
College integration--Georgia--Athens--History.
King, Lonnie.
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968.
Lewis, John, 1940 Feb. 21-
Oral histories.
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)
United States. Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Related Collections in this Repository

Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection

Reflections on Georgia Politics Oral History Collection, ROGP 139 John Lewis


Series Descriptions and Folder Listing

ROGP 133 Julian Bond video on YouTube, 27 February 2012 (Extent: 77.0 minutes ) Access Online